Monthly Archives: February 2016

Call for papers

European Journal of English Studies, CALL FOR PAPERS FOR VOLUME 22, Poetry, Science and Technology

Poetry, Science and Technology

Guest editors: Irmtraud Huber (Berne), Wolfgang Funk (Mainz)

 

In the preface to Lyrical Ballads, William Wordsworth famously calls poetry ‘the first and last of all knowledge’ and describes the poet’s task as carrying ‘sensation into the objects of science itself’. The editors invite contributions that explore relations between poetic and scientific knowledge, an association commonly neglected in favour of a focus on narrative. Moreover, we seek to explore how technological advances such as the invention and development of eveÍr more sophisticated machinery or changes in the means of communication find echoes in the imaginary and structure of poetry.

 

By focusing on these connections and correspondences between apparently dissimilar ways of world-making, this issue aims to offer new perspectives on the interplay between scientific and technological innovation and poetic form. It will attempt to trace how paradigm changes such as Darwinism, post-Newtonian physics or non-Euclidean geometry find correlatives in poetry. The editors also wish to promote a critical dialogue between poetic and narratological approaches to relations between literature and science at different historical moments. We welcome critical engagements with specific case studies of poetic or scientific works, as well as theoretical reflections on the relations between poetry and science and technology from the nineteenth to the twenty-first century.

 

Relevant topics in this context might include, among others:

 

  • poetry and science as complementary and/or competing epistemological structures and forms of knowledge conservation and dissemination
  • concepts and metaphors common to both poetry and science, like the experiment, the model, innovation or abstraction
  • formal transformations in poetry in relation to scientific and technological paradigm changes
  • shifts in the cultural authority of science and poetry
  • poetry as a possible mediator between abstract scientific knowledge and its technological application
  • representations of scientific procedures and knowledge as well as technological innovation in poetry

Detailed proposals (600-1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as any inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors Irmtraud Huber and Wolfgang Funk.

 

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of proposals and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS 31 OCTOBER 2016, WITH DELIVERY OF COMPLETED ESSAYS BY 31 MARCH 2017.

 

Call for papers Various

European Journal of English Studies, CALL FOR PAPERS FOR VOLUME 22, Approaches to Old Age

Approaches to Old Age

Guest Editors: Sarah Falcus (Huddersfield) and Maricel Oró Piqueras (Lleida)

 

The final decades of the twentieth century saw the rise of humanistic or cultural gerontology, and this has continued apace into the twenty-first century. Interest in English Studies has ranged across the disciplines and beyond, establishing connections with biomedicine, sociology and politics. This work includes studies and creative projects that both analyse and produce visual representations of ageing, from photography to film. In linguistics, explorations of language attrition in Alzheimer’s Disease provide humanistic perspectives on the experience and treatment of this form of dementia. Literary studies has seen explorations of the affect value of literary and cultural texts and analyses of the intersections of ageing and gender, race, sexuality and disability. There is also much work on late-life creativity and late style.

 

This issue seeks to extend the variety and multiplicity of approaches in cultural gerontology, contributing to the dialogue between English Studies and Ageing Studies. We welcome contributions that explore old age across the full range of literary and cultural forms.

 

Topics may include, but are not limited to:

 

  • the ageing body
  • approaching old age
  • genre and age
  • ageing readers/audiences
  • ageing as a cultural anxiety
  • old age across history
  • picturing old age
  • ageing and loss of language
  • language use and Alzheimer’s Disease

 

Detailed proposals (600-1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as any inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors: Sarah Falcus and Maricel Oró Piqueras.

 

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of proposals and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS 31 OCTOBER 2016, WITH DELIVERY OF COMPLETED ESSAYS BY 31 MARCH 2017.

Call for papers Various

European Journal of English Studies, CALL FOR PAPERS FOR VOLUME 22, Global Responses to the ‘War on Terror’

Global Responses to the ‘War on Terror’

Guest editors: Michael C. Frank (Düsseldorf) and Pavan Kumar Malreddy (Goethe University Frankfurt)

 

This issue proposes a thematic shift from the widely discussed traumatic impact of the 11 September 2001 attacks themselves to the transformative impact of the ensuing ‘war on terror’. In particular, it identifies a conceptual gap in the existing criticism on ‘9/11’ and its cultural resonance, which tends to privilege Euro-American responses to the event, while considering trauma, grief and suffering as primarily transatlantic experiences. The corresponding Anglophone canon of ‘post-9/11’ fiction and nonfiction literature, documentary, drama, and film has failed to address the responsive violence incited by the decade-long military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, the destabilisation of political regimes in the Middle East, and other clandestine operations in the Global South in the name of countering ‘terrorism’.

 

The aim of this issue is to de-centre the singularity assumed by ‘9/11’, and to draw attention to new sites of literary and cultural criticism that move beyond the destruction of the World Trade Center and the physical space of New York City to engage with the multiple crises related to the ‘war on terror’ on a global scale.

 

Contributions are invited from any sub-discipline in Anglophone cultures and might include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

 

  • transatlantic and diasporic responses to the ‘war on terror’
  • intersections of European and postcolonial criticism in approaching the ‘war on terror’
  • public discourses on terrorism and counter-terrorism
  • responses to the war on terror in architecture, monuments, memorials, photography, visual arts, sculpture, rituals (commemoration), popular culture (internet, social media) and video-games
  • terrorism in novels, poetry, and reportage narratives from the Global South and the Middle East

 

Detailed proposals (600-1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as any inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors, Michael C. Frank and Pavan Malreddy.

 

 

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of proposals and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS 31 OCTOBER 2016, WITH DELIVERY OF COMPLETED ESSAYS BY 31 MARCH 2017.