Call for papers Various

European Journal of English Studies, CALL FOR PAPERS FOR VOLUME 22, Global Responses to the ‘War on Terror’

Global Responses to the ‘War on Terror’

Guest editors: Michael C. Frank (Düsseldorf) and Pavan Kumar Malreddy (Goethe University Frankfurt)

 

This issue proposes a thematic shift from the widely discussed traumatic impact of the 11 September 2001 attacks themselves to the transformative impact of the ensuing ‘war on terror’. In particular, it identifies a conceptual gap in the existing criticism on ‘9/11’ and its cultural resonance, which tends to privilege Euro-American responses to the event, while considering trauma, grief and suffering as primarily transatlantic experiences. The corresponding Anglophone canon of ‘post-9/11’ fiction and nonfiction literature, documentary, drama, and film has failed to address the responsive violence incited by the decade-long military campaigns in Iraq and Afghanistan, the destabilisation of political regimes in the Middle East, and other clandestine operations in the Global South in the name of countering ‘terrorism’.

 

The aim of this issue is to de-centre the singularity assumed by ‘9/11’, and to draw attention to new sites of literary and cultural criticism that move beyond the destruction of the World Trade Center and the physical space of New York City to engage with the multiple crises related to the ‘war on terror’ on a global scale.

 

Contributions are invited from any sub-discipline in Anglophone cultures and might include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

 

  • transatlantic and diasporic responses to the ‘war on terror’
  • intersections of European and postcolonial criticism in approaching the ‘war on terror’
  • public discourses on terrorism and counter-terrorism
  • responses to the war on terror in architecture, monuments, memorials, photography, visual arts, sculpture, rituals (commemoration), popular culture (internet, social media) and video-games
  • terrorism in novels, poetry, and reportage narratives from the Global South and the Middle East

 

Detailed proposals (600-1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as any inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors, Michael C. Frank and Pavan Malreddy.

 

 

Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates a two-stage review process. The first is based on the submission of proposals and results in invitations to submit full essays from which a final selection is then made. THE DEADLINE FOR PROPOSALS IS 31 OCTOBER 2016, WITH DELIVERY OF COMPLETED ESSAYS BY 31 MARCH 2017.

 

ELOPE Various

Vol 12, No 2 (2015) of ELOPE was put online

Dear contributors to ELOPE, dear members of SDAŠ, and dear friends,
 
It is with great pleasure that we inform you that Vol 12, No 2 (2015) of ELOPE was put online in December 2015. You can view and download the whole issue at http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/issue/archive.
 
We would like to inform you that we plan to produce a printed version as well. When it is ready, the authors and SDAŠ members will receive their copies free of charge. 
 
With kind regards and best wishes for a successful 2016,
 
Smiljana Komar, Editor
Uroš Mozetič, Editor
Various

SDAŠ Conference 2016: M@king It New In English Studies

Dear friends and followers, we are very pleased to announce a call for papers for the 2016 SDAŠ conference:

CALL FOR PAPERS

Geopolitical shifts, rapid advances in technology and fluid socio-cultural paradigms are only a few symptoms of our time. However, an old adage has it that the more things change, the more they stay the same. How much does this apply to English Studies? Has English language teaching changed radically in recent years? Are linguistic approaches from the past still valid? What makes a literary canon modern? How does scholarship in English Studies age? What are the implications of the quest for originality? How new is new?

These and other related questions will be addressed at the 4th International Conference of the Slovene Association for the Study of English (SDAŠ), entitled:

M@king It New In English Studies

The conference will take place on 15-17 September 2016 at the University of Maribor, Slovenia.

We are honored to confirm the following plenary speakers:
Professor Jonathan Culpeper (Lancaster University)
Professor Roberta Maierhofer (University of Graz)
Professor Marianne Nikolov (University of Pécs)

You are welcome to submit a proposal for a 20-minute presentation addressing the above questions with regard to any of the following fields:
English language;
Literatures in English;
English Language Teaching;
Cultural Studies;
Translation Studies;
Or other related (sub)disciplines.

The conference will include two special panels (more information is available on the conference website):
Moments of Being Virginia Woolf
Shakespeare’s European Afterlife

Abstracts of between 200 and 300 words can be submitted here:
http://events.ff.um.si/sdas2016/?page_id=160

The due date for the submission of abstracts is 10 May 2016. Authors will be notified about the acceptance of their proposal by 1 June 2016.

Conference fee:
120 € regular
60 € student (please email a copy of student ID)
100 € regular, ESSE members
50 € student, ESSE members (please email a copy of student ID)
40 € late registration fee (to be added to all registration fees after 15 July 2016)
50 € single day registration (non-participating visitors only)

Please visit the conference website for more information:
http://events.ff.um.si/sdas2016/

Various

Call for Papers: ELOPE Vol. 13, No.1 – Thematic Issue on Words and Music

We are pleased to announce another call for papers with a special topic, this time on Words and Music:

ELOPE is planning to publish a thematic issue on the relationship between words and music, and the place of that relationship in modern culture.

Possible topics of relevance include, but are not limited to, songs and song lyrics, poems set to music, novels about music and musicians, opera and librettos, rock opera, metaphor in music, translating song lyrics, phonetics and pronunciation in singing, drama and dramatic elements in music videos, music and travel, music and tourism, music journalism, music and ideology, using song lyrics in the classroom, and songs and culture.

The language of contributions is English. Papers should be between 5,000 and 8,000 worlds in length, with an abstract of 150–180 words. They should be submitted electronically, and should conform to the author guidelines available at http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/about/submissions.

Any inquiries can be sent to Prof. Nada Šabec (nada.sabec@um.si), Guest Editor of ELOPE 13 (1).

Submission deadline: February 1st, 2016.

http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/announcement/view/31

Calls ELOPE Various

Publication of the latest issue of ELOPE

Dear members and friends of the Slovene Association for the Study of English,

We are delighted to announce the publication of the latest issue of ELOPE (Vol. 12, No. 1, 2015, Ljubljana University Press). The special issue “Cultural Encounters with the English-Speaking World,” edited by Monika Kavalir and Andrej Stopar, is already available on-line (http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/issue/view/298).

Please note that the past volumes of ELOPE are also accessible on-line (http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/issue/archive). Each article now has a DOI number (e.g., http://dx.doi.org/10.4312/elope.12.1.137-139), which makes the articles and their citations easier to find and track.

We kindly invite you to submit your contribution for the next issue. The call for papers can be found here:  http://revije.ff.uni-lj.si/elope/announcement/view/28. Please submit your articles using the on-line platform.

We wish you a pleasant summer!

Various

Language Tip 36 (2014-15)

How vs. what…like

These two expressions are sometimes interchangeable and sometimes not:
How are you?
What is she like?
The media tell us what the perfect body looks like. / The media tell us how the perfect body looks.

It is important to note that even in contexts that allow both expressions they cannot be combined. More directly: it is embarrassing when advanced speakers of English say “I know how the perfect summer looks like.”

Jason Blake and Monika Kavalir

All tips to date…

Various

Language Tip 35 (2014-15)

either vs. as well/too

Spot the error in these sentences:
“I don’t like vanilla ice cream and I don’t like chocolate cake too.”
“We are not disinclined to accepting the changes, and our customers are not adverse to the changes as well.”

Remember to use “either” instead of “too” or “as well” in negative constructions.
“I don’t like vanilla ice cream and I don’t like chocolate cake either.” (Assuming the meaning is “I don’t like ice cream or cake.”)
“We are not disinclined to accepting the changes, and our customers are not adverse to the changes either.” (Be especially vigilant when using double negatives.)

Jason Blake and Monika Kavalir

All tips to date…

www2.arnes.si
Various

Language Tip 34 (2014-15)

Take note vs. take notes

“Take note of this tip; take notes if you need help remembering.”

“To take note of something” means to pay attention to it.
E.g. “I took note of his advice, but I still ignored it.”

“To take notes” means to jot things down.
“What happened during the lecture? Dunno. I forget to take notes.”

Jason Blake and Monika Kavalir

All tips to date…
http://www2.arnes.si/~bjason/tips%20-%202014%202015.pdf

Various

Language Tip 33 (2014-15)

Get vs. acquire; get vs. become

“Get” and “acquire” are not interchangeable, because “acquire” means specifically to gain possession of and is normally not used with things you cannot actually have and hold, such as attention.

CORRECT: “I finally got her attention.”
INCORRECT: “I finally acquired her attention.”

Similarly, “get” and “become” are not always interchangeable. The short version: “get” is less formal than “become.”
One of us was taught a long time ago never to use “get” in an essay; the other one pretty much figured it out by themselves.

Consider the mixed-register tone of this:
“Hamlet, never a happy man, gets increasingly world-weary and melancholic as the play progresses.”

Jason Blake and Monika Kavalir

All tips to date…
http://www2.arnes.si/~bjason/tips%20-%202014%202015.pdf

Various

Language Tip 32 (2014-15)

Sentence fragments can sound very, very silly in English. Slovenian seems to have a higher tolerance for syntax-poor snippets of language.
Though we are tempted to say, “Always use full sentences,” that would be going too far!
Instead, a simple never-rule: never start a sentence fragment with a relative clause.
Which would look and sound strange.

Here’s an example in context:
“The world is swimming in horrible movies, whether they be violent action movies or saccharine, simplistic romances. Which is not surprising, given the necessity for studios to produce in a hurry.”

If you’re really really tempted and you feel a comma just wouldn’t do your thought process justice, use a dash:
“The world is swimming in horrible movies, whether they be violent action movies or saccharine, simplistic romances – which is not surprising, given the necessity for studios to produce in a hurry.”

Jason Blake and Monika Kavalir

All tips to date…
http://www2.arnes.si/~bjason/tips%20-%202014%202015.pdf